Pieter Verstraete “Education and the Body”

This video from Pieter Verstraete (KU Leuven, Belgium) is one of four lead off recordings in which historians discuss education and the body as part of the ISCHE April 2017 History of Education Salon.  Captions available in English.

Please feel free to add comments below or craft your own blog post to contribute to the conversation.

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This video from Georges Vigarello (École des hautes études en sciences sociales – Paris, France) is one of four lead off recordings in which historians discuss education and the body

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le corps saisi (blog post from Rebecca Rogers)

As the organizer of this first History of education salon, I thought it might be interesting to comment on what this experience offered me, as an historian of education who

2 Comments

  1. Kate Rousmaniere
    April 12, 13:18
    Provocation #1 of Pieter Verstraete's post is supplemented, or do I mean accentuated? or do I mean compounded? by the visual image of the body moving at the gym. I am reminded that in most of my life, bodies are covered and muted and veiled EXCEPT at the gym, where it's all about bodies, all the time, almost flagrantly. It's a Body House and we see, smell, and feel bodies everywhere. I love seeing this image while listening to the more reflective, intellectual discussion about bodies. In academia, we have come to talk so much about bodies (I just co-coordinated an entire conference about education and the body!) in which we talked and talked and thought and thought. And here we see this guy working his muscles, moving his body so clearly and powerfully.
  2. Danny Wildemeersch
    April 21, 08:30
    A wonderful way of provoking the reflection on how historians (of education) have dealt with bodies in their work. We need more of such experiments! Congrats.

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